Native Land Design Blog

How Much Water Does Your Texas Landscape Need In the Winter

Chris Rhodes, Director of Marketing and Development

We often hear the question; how often do I water during the winter?  Whether it is a board of directors putting together a performance scope or a homeowner just adjusting their irrigation clock, what is the answer?  There are several opinions ranging from not at all to 3 times a week. As you can imagine, several opinions can arise when asked this question so let’s dig a little deeper.    


Fall Landscaping "To-Do" List for Property Managers

Ben Collinsworth

 

Texas commercial properties have faced a good freeze already this fall, and the grass is finally dormant.

 

The landscape appears to finally be going to bed for the winter.  

 

But this doesn’t mean you should neglect your commercial landscape. There are some important tasks that are essential for you to keep at the top of your priority list to help prepare your Texas property for the coming year and active growing season.


Hate Landscape Budget Planning? Your Account Manager Can Help!

Ben Collinsworth

It’s that time of year again … and it’s not one that many folks look forward to.


Dental cleaning and cavity filling? Root canal time? Your least favorite distant relative is coming to visit? And they want to stay with you for a week? Nope. None of the above! It’s landscape budget planning season. And some property managers say it’s even more dreadful than any painful dental visit or uncomfortable family get-together.


Why is this the worst time of year? Because it’s getting to be the busiest time of year as school starts soon and the holidays near, so momentum is building toward year’s end. At the same time, meeting or beating annual numbers is on everyone’s mind. Planning the next year’s budget amidst all of this activity is typically one of the least enjoyable aspects of your job. 

Sometimes, though, we make the task worse on ourselves because we don’t take advantage of tools and tricks that can make it easier. You can avoid the many pain points of landscape budget planning by taking advantage of the wisdom of your landscape account manager.

Here’s how.



Three 2018 Commercial Landscaping Trends Property Managers Should Take Note Of

Ben Collinsworth

Being a commercial property manager in a competitive market like Texas isn’t easy.

You have to market yourself and your skills to the owners of the buildings you manage, as well as the client tenants who rent, work or live in the properties you maintain, while making sure both are content and satisfied.

At the same time, if you work in a competitive market you need to stay on top of trends to ensure your property is appealing to current and prospective tenants. But since you’ve got a lot on your plate, how can you ensure you have fresh, new ideas to present to help contribute to the growth of your property?

That’s why Native Land Design is here: to help you by suggesting these top three commercial landscaping trends.


What Are The Pros and Cons of a Self-Performing Vs. a Subcontracting Landscape Company?

Ben Collinsworth

When you’re looking to satisfy the lawn and landscape management needs of your Texas commercial property or properties, and you’ve made the decision to look outside of your current organization for a vendor to help, the market provides you with two choices: hire vendors that self-perform their services or opt for vendors who subcontract their services.

Self-performing the services means the company you hire sends their maintenance crews out to do the work, while subcontracting means they hire another company to do the work for them while still playing the role of account manager. So, in essence, with subcontracting, a truck with a different logo than the company you hired may show up to your property to conduct the duties that need performed on your commercial landscape.

So, which do you choose?


3 Questions Every HOA Board Should Ask Their Commercial Landscape Contractor in Texas

Ben Collinsworth

How do you feel about the landscape and grounds at your Texas homeowners’ association?

Are your needs and expectations being met? Do you know what’s happening on your property in regard to irrigation maintenance and repair? Do you know where you want to invest additional dollars on your property for the most impact? Do you have regular and consistent communication with your landscape vendor?


What is Wastewater Averaging?

Ben Collinsworth

Ever heard of the term wastewater averaging?


It’s a term you should be familiar with concerning water costs on your Texas commercial property.


Why? Because, generally, the cost of wastewater is higher than the cost of potable water. That means it’s possible to get three times more savings by conserving wastewater than by conserving potable water. Want to learn how?


What We Look For in the Perfect Client

Ben Collinsworth

The success of any company hinges largely on strong client relationships. One can offer promotions for free services and slash prices to bring in as many new customers as possible, but unless a business can get a good chunk of those customers coming back again and again, business could suffer.

Exceptional client service is a core value of companies that make it a priority. These companies want to be their customers’ trusted partners versus just one of their many vendors.


Native Land Design likes to develop long-lasting relationships with its clients. Here are some of the things we look for in the perfect Texas commercial client.


5 Ways Choosing the Lowest Bid Could End Up Costing You Money

Ben Collinsworth

As a Texas commercial property manager, you rely on bids in response to your requests for proposal (RFPs) in order to determine which landscape contractor is best for your job.

However, unless you’ve given the bidders the exact specifications for your job—for instance, property maps and drawings, material lists or requirements and minimum expectations on everything from hours spent on the job to the thickness of mulch to the number of flower installations and flats—the bids you receive are educated guesses on how each landscape professional interpreted your RFP.

These guesses—or assumptions—and the resulting prices could be vastly different solely based on how they interpreted the bid.

As a minimum, your RFP should include a property map, indicating which areas of the property need serviced; a service list, sharing the list of tasks you want performed on your property; and a budget range. Assuming these details are in order, the bids that come in should only reflect a 10% and 15% difference in price.

As the bids roll in, you may notice one that is irresistibly low. Though this may seem like luck, there are serious concerns with just choosing the cheapest bid. In fact, it may cost you more money in the long-run.

Here are 5 ways choosing the lowest bid could end up costing you more in the end.


Hate Landscape Budget Planning? Your Account Manager Can Help!

Ben Collinsworth

It’s that time of year again … and it’s not one that many folks look forward to.


Dental cleaning and cavity filling? Root canal time? You least favorite distant relative is coming to visit? And they want to stay with you for a week? Nope. None of the above! It’s landscape budget planning season. And some property managers say it’s even more dreadful than any painful dental visit or uncomfortable family get-together.


Why is this the worst time of year? Because it’s getting to be the busiest time of year as school starts soon and the holidays near, so momentum is building toward year’s end. At the same time, meeting or beating annual numbers is on everyone’s mind. Planning the next year’s budget amidst all of this activity is typically one of the least enjoyable aspects of your job. 

Sometimes, though, we make the task worse on ourselves because we don’t take advantage of tools and tricks that can make it easier. You can avoid the many pain points of landscape budget planning, by taking advantage of the wisdom of your landscape account manager.

Here’s how.